atlasobscura
atlasobscura:

ATLAS OBSCURA’S FIRST GEOGRAPHER-IN-RESIDENCE: KCYMAERXTHAERE
BY EAMES DEMETRIOS / 06 AUG 2014
My name is Eames Demetrios and I am the Geographer-at-Large for Kcymaerxthaere. In that capacity, I go around the world installing markers and historic sites that honor events from a parallel world in our world. So far we’ve installed 100 Kcymaerxthaere sites in 22 countries and the number continues to grow. And for the longest time, only a few were on Atlas Obscura, so it seemed time to share the treasure map and use it as way create some new geography experiences.
Explore more places in kcymaerxthaere at atlas obscura

atlasobscura:

ATLAS OBSCURA’S FIRST GEOGRAPHER-IN-RESIDENCE: KCYMAERXTHAERE

BY EAMES DEMETRIOS / 06 AUG 2014
My name is Eames Demetrios and I am the Geographer-at-Large for Kcymaerxthaere. In that capacity, I go around the world installing markers and historic sites that honor events from a parallel world in our world. So far we’ve installed 100 Kcymaerxthaere sites in 22 countries and the number continues to grow. And for the longest time, only a few were on Atlas Obscura, so it seemed time to share the treasure map and use it as way create some new geography experiences.
bornofanatombomb

new-aesthetic:

How One Woman Hid Her Pregnancy From Big Data

For the past nine months, Janet Vertesi, assistant professor of sociology at Princeton University, tried to hide from the Internet the fact that she’s pregnant — and it wasn’t easy. Pregnant women are incredibly valuable to marketers. For example, if a woman decides between Huggies and Pampers diapers, that’s a valuable, long-term decision that establishes a consumption pattern. According to Vertesi, the average person’s marketing data is worth 10 cents; a pregnant woman’s data skyrockets to $1.50. And once targeted advertising finds a pregnant woman, it won’t let up. […] First, Vertesi made sure there were absolutely no mentions of her pregnancy on social media, which is one of the biggest ways marketers collect information. She called and emailed family directly to tell them the good news, while also asking them not to put anything on Facebook. She even unfriended her uncle after he sent a congratulatory Facebook message. She also made sure to only use cash when buying anything related to her pregnancy, so no information could be shared through her credit cards or store-loyalty cards. For items she did want to buy online, Vertesi created an Amazon account linked to an email address on a personal server, had all packages delivered to a local locker and made sure only to use Amazon gift cards she bought with cash. […] Genius, right? But not exactly foolproof. Vertesi said that by dodging advertising and traditional forms of consumerism, her activity raised a lot of red flags. When her husband tried to buy $500 worth of Amazon gift cards with cash in order to get a stroller, a notice at the Rite Aid counter said the company had a legal obligation to report excessive transactions to the authorities. “Those kinds of activities, when you take them in the aggregate … are exactly the kinds of things that tag you as likely engaging in criminal activity, as opposed to just having a baby,” she said.

Via BLDGBLOG


Slippage and instability threaten to bring some of the buildings down, not just putting the site’s UNESCO-designated mansions at risk but potentially injuring (or worse) its annual hordes of international visitors.

[Image: General view of Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius; courtesy U.S. Library of Congress].

In Phys.org’s words, the sensors are being installed “to assess ‘risks of hydrogeological instability’ at the sprawling site, boost security and test the solidity of structures, as well as set up an early warning system to flag up possible collapses.”

The results are a bit like electronic eavesdropping—a kind of NSA of the ruins—only, instead of wire-tapping a single phone line, the entire city of Pompeii will be listened to from within, hooked up from one side to the other with equipment so sensitive it is normally used in waging “electronic warfare.”

[Image: The Street of Tombs, Pompeii; courtesy U.S. Library of Congress].

The data will eventually be made available online for all to analyze, but it is interesting to read of a more immediate use of the sensors’ findings: Pompeii’s “security guards will be supplied with special radio equipment as well as smartphone apps to improve communication that can pinpoint their position and the type of intervention required.”

In other words, guards will receive electronic updates from the city itself while out on their daily rounds, including automated pings and alerts of impending structural failure or deformations of the ground, like some weird, semi-militarized version of ambient music, as if listening to the real-time groans of a settling city by radio